planted city

free counters

Victoria remains Canada’s cycling commuter capital, with nearly 6 per cent of residents choosing to ride a bicycle on their daily commute. An additional 10 per cent of Victorians commute by foot.

On the other end of the spectrum, St. John’s and Saint John have the lowest rates of bicycle commuting in Canada, but comparatively high rates of walking to work. Montreal, Toronto and Ottawa have the highest percentage of citizens depending on public transit to get them to work, with more than one in five using those systems.

Across Canada, it’s the cities struggling with congestion the most that are seeing the strongest gains in active transportation. Walking and cycling to work is often seen as a way of avoiding the headaches of public transit and the slow slog of a packed freeway.

Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Edmonton and Vancouver all posted gains in active transportation between 2006 and 2011.

Source: 'Canada's commuter cyclist capital is…'

Related: What-happens-when-we-reach-peak-car.

Seen Around (Another) Town: Walking from Brooklyn to NYC across the historic Brooklyn Bridge

Seen Around (Another) Town: Walking from Brooklyn to NYC across the historic Brooklyn Bridge

Seen Around, Another Town:
I’m always on the lookout for cool and interesting bike infrastructure when exploring cities. I came this bike corral in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighbourhood recently.
The car-shaped corral occupies what would traditionally be space for one car to park in. It provides space for up to twenty bikes. 
However, despite its clever and efficient design the corral has some limitations compared with other designs:

Seattle’s Department of Transportation has started installing on-street bike corrals that are easier to use, more versatile and expandable, and cost just a third as much as the ones they had been using.  (Seattle Bike Blog)

Seen Around, Another Town:

I’m always on the lookout for cool and interesting bike infrastructure when exploring cities. I came this bike corral in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighbourhood recently.

The car-shaped corral occupies what would traditionally be space for one car to park in. It provides space for up to twenty bikes. 

However, despite its clever and efficient design the corral has some limitations compared with other designs:

Seattle’s Department of Transportation has started installing on-street bike corrals that are easier to use, more versatile and expandable, and cost just a third as much as the ones they had been using.  (Seattle Bike Blog)
If you build a city that is great for an eight-year-old and for an 80-year-old, then you build a city that is going to be great for everybody. They’re like an indicator species. We need to stop building cities as if everybody in them is 30 years old and athletic.

Gil Penalosa, the "pied piper for sustainable transportation," quoted in a Globe & Mail profile. 

Photo: The Atlantic Cities

Seen Around Town: Riding the SkyTrain through Brentwood station in Burnaby. You can see Metrotown in the distance.

Seen Around Town: Riding the SkyTrain through Brentwood station in Burnaby. You can see Metrotown in the distance.

Bikes and balloons: A shot from the streets of Amsterdam

Bikes and balloons: A shot from the streets of Amsterdam

Seen around town: riding the sunset at English Bay

Seen around town: riding the sunset at English Bay

An image from an ad that caught my eye… human systems

An image from an ad that caught my eye… human systems