Millennials are far less likely to own a car, or to even make that a priority. Instead, we tend to opt for public transit, biking, or car sharing. While millennials don’t identify as vegetarians, either, we actually trend towards eating less meat – and we value the eating experience, which means that, though we tend to make less for our work (or sometimes nothing at all), a lot of us are still willing to spend a little more to go organic and local. Heck, even the fact that so many of us still live at home, or choose to live in shared houses or dorms rather than getting a place of our own, translates to a more efficient use of household water, electricity, and gas.

Which isn’t to say that millennials are making these choices exactly for the purpose of being green. We do it because it makes sense: Green living is more affordable, more enjoyable, and thus perhaps makes us more able to deal with the messes we’ve been left with. But, as long as things are starting to change, does it really matter what the motivation is? And can’t there be more than one motivation? Millennials seem more likely to recognize that the environment doesn’t exist in a glass bubble, that it’s tied in with business, technology, and what’s on your plate. Protecting the environment is not something out there and far away, but something right here that needs to be intelligently incorporated into our day-to-day.

… what changed was the context. Now, that is a really important lesson for us about how change occurs. We put it off and we delay. We wait until the last minute until nothing else, you know, can possibly get in the way. Until we really have to act now. Then we wait a bit longer, right. And then we do it. And we do that very consistently and that’s the lesson of World War II and that’s the lesson of so many crises, that we wait and we wait and then we panic and then we respond and we do extraordinary things.

A quote from Paul Gilding's talk at Powershift 2013 in Melbourne, Australia. Gilding is one of the world’s most experienced and respected business advisors and public speakers on sustainability and climate change.

    You can check out the rest of his presentation here.

    Related:

    Infographic source: The Climate Council)

    It appears that the world’s second-largest economy and biggest climate offender is on the verge of an energy shift…

    Source: China’s Green Revolution Arrives, Spiegel Online

    Young Folks, Technology & Sustainability: Shift happens…
From The Huffington Post:
Millennials would rather give up driving than their smartphone or laptop, a survey commissioned by the car rental company Zipcar finds.
…
More than any other age group, millennials said they make a conscious attempt to reduce the amount of time they drive by carpooling, taking public transportation, riding a bike or walking, according to the study. Millennials were more likely to communicate with friends online than to see them in person, and more likely to order online than to drive somewhere to buy something.
More here.
Chart via: ‘Millennials Say They’d Give Up Their Cars Before Their Computers or Cell Phones’ (Atlantic Cities)

    Young Folks, Technology & Sustainability: Shift happens…

    From The Huffington Post:

    Millennials would rather give up driving than their smartphone or laptop, a survey commissioned by the car rental company Zipcar finds.

    More than any other age group, millennials said they make a conscious attempt to reduce the amount of time they drive by carpooling, taking public transportation, riding a bike or walking, according to the study. Millennials were more likely to communicate with friends online than to see them in person, and more likely to order online than to drive somewhere to buy something.

    More here.

    Chart via: ‘Millennials Say They’d Give Up Their Cars Before Their Computers or Cell Phones’ (Atlantic Cities)

    image

    From Der Spiegel:

    Indeed, the statistics are impressive. It’s estimated that some 50,000 wind turbines have been exported from this mini-kingdom between the North and Baltic seas, nearly 50 percent of the wind-powered generators worldwide. But sales are declining now that large industrialized nations, such as India, China and the US, are emulating the Danes’ success.

    In addition to the graceful, towering turbines made of fiberglass and steel, however, Denmark has also given the world a shining example of sustainability: The parliamentary monarchy is widely seen as a laboratory and model for how an entire country can make the transition away from coal, oil and gas and toward energy generated from renewable resources.

    Today, already 24 percent of the electricity consumed in Denmark comes from wind power — a world record. There are plans to increase this to 50 percent by 2020, and the country intends to become entirely independent of fossil fuels by 2050.

    Check out the rest of the article here.

    (Photo source: Der Spiegel)

    Kent Larson: ‘Brilliant designs to fit more people in every city’

    From TED Talks via YouTube:

    How can we fit more people into cities without overcrowding? Kent Larson shows off folding cars, quick-change apartments and other innovations that could make the city of the future work a lot like a small village of the past.

    From The Hill’s E2 Wire:

    Most undecided voters want more action from President Obama and Congress to fight global warming, and a substantial percentage say the topic will influence their ballot for president, a new poll shows.

    The joint Yale University/George Mason University (GMU) survey found that undecided voters’ beliefs about the existence and causes of global warming are far closer to President Obama’s likely voters than GOP rival Mitt Romney’s.

    Sixty-four percent of undecided voters believe Obama should be doing more to address climate change, and 72 percent say Congress should be doing more.

    Check out the rest of the article here.

    Related:

    SustainaWiki is a wiki site designed with one thing in mind: offering information about sustainability to anyone who needs it! Don’t see a page you’re looking for? Make a username and create the page!

    I had a quick look around SustainaWiki and it appears quite new with much of the content fairly limited and using 2012 references. So far there are pages addressing energyfoodhome improvementhow-to guides, landscaping, technology, transportation, and waste management. If you’ve got some time and knowledge to share… well, you know what to do. If you need some guidance, you might want to check out the users guide.

    Many people would say that climate change is one of the most important problems that we humans are facing and it’s a really big, complicated and hard problem: that’s reason for pessimism. I think there is at least one reason for optimism, which is that we now have a new way of approaching really big, complicated, hard and global problems that wasn’t possible even 15 years ago.

    If you think of things like Wikipedia, Google or the Linux open-sourced operating system, these examples all show that it is now possible to harness the collective intelligence of thousands of people all over the world to solve really big, complicated and hard problems at a scale and with a degree of collaboration that was never possible before. So our goal in this project is to use that approach applied to the problem about what to do about global climate change.

    Thomas Malone, senior professor at MIT in the Globe & Mail article, Putting collective intelligence to work on a global threat’. He is one of the lead researchers behind the school’s innovative 'Climate Co-lab' project. You can check it out and get involved here.