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Infographic: Global Sea Level Rise Projections and Risk to the U.S.A.

A 2012 study by the U.S. Geological Survey determined that sea levels along the East Coast will rise three to four times faster than the global average. The study named Norfolk, New York City, and Boston as the three metro areas most vulnerable to the devastating effects of rising sea levels—ranging from the dramatic increase in storm surge, as winds scoop up water from the sea and dump more of it farther from the coast than ever before, to the steady erosion of roads, buildings, and arable soil as seawater creeps inland.

Source: ‘The Scary Truth About How Much Climate Change is Costing You’ (National Journal)

Infographic: Global Sea Level Rise Projections and Risk to the U.S.A.

A 2012 study by the U.S. Geological Survey determined that sea levels along the East Coast will rise three to four times faster than the global average. The study named Norfolk, New York City, and Boston as the three metro areas most vulnerable to the devastating effects of rising sea levels—ranging from the dramatic increase in storm surge, as winds scoop up water from the sea and dump more of it farther from the coast than ever before, to the steady erosion of roads, buildings, and arable soil as seawater creeps inland.

Source: ‘The Scary Truth About How Much Climate Change is Costing You’ (National Journal)

The melt-off from the world’s ice sheets, ice caps and glaciers over eight years of the past decade would have been enough to cover the United States in about 18 inches (46 centimeters) of water.

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A quote from the LiveScience article, 'NASA Satellites Show How Our Icy World Is Melting'. It profiles a new study that points out that, "The Earth is losing an incredible amount of ice to the oceans annually, and these new results will help us answer important questions in terms of both sea rise and how the planet’s cold regions are responding to global change." You can check out the full article here

(Photo source: LiveScience)

Cartoon: ‘The Last Climate Denier…”
(Source: Slate)

Cartoon: ‘The Last Climate Denier…”

(Source: Slate)

Infographic: ‘Arctic Ice Melt’
The infographic accompanies the Globe & Mail article, 'Canadian Arctic nearly loses entire ice shelf from global warming’

Infographic: ‘Arctic Ice Melt’

The infographic accompanies the Globe & Mail article, 'Canadian Arctic nearly loses entire ice shelf from global warming


Climate Change in Action: Greenland’s Petermann Glacier Before & After the 2010 Ice Break
In addition to the photos, an article in the Huffington Post explains that:

When a 100 square mile chunk — an area four times the size of Manhattan — broke off Greenland’s Petermann Glacier in the summer of 2010, scientists knew that it was a historic event. After all, it was the largest known calving in Greenland’s history, and the largest to occur in the Arctic in nearly 50 years.
…
Jason Box, a scientist with the Byrd Polar Research Center at The Ohio State University and photographer of the 2009 image, told HuffPost that the summer of 2010 was Greenland’s warmest on record, and records have been kept since 1873.
"We’re bearing witness to abrupt climate change,” Box told HuffPost. "This isn’t in the future. It’s very much now."
To see more before and after images and to learn about the Petermann Glacier, visit the Byrd Polar Research Center. For more images of Greenland’s glaciers, click here.

Check out the rest of the article here.

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Climate Change in Action: Greenland’s Petermann Glacier Before & After the 2010 Ice Break

In addition to the photos, an article in the Huffington Post explains that:

When a 100 square mile chunk — an area four times the size of Manhattan — broke off Greenland’s Petermann Glacier in the summer of 2010, scientists knew that it was a historic event. After all, it was the largest known calving in Greenland’s history, and the largest to occur in the Arctic in nearly 50 years.

Jason Box, a scientist with the Byrd Polar Research Center at The Ohio State University and photographer of the 2009 image, told HuffPost that the summer of 2010 was Greenland’s warmest on record, and records have been kept since 1873.

"We’re bearing witness to abrupt climate change,” Box told HuffPost. "This isn’t in the future. It’s very much now."

To see more before and after images and to learn about the Petermann Glacier, visit the Byrd Polar Research Center. For more images of Greenland’s glaciers, click here.

Check out the rest of the article here.