Canada, Our Changing Climate & ‘The Winter That Wasn’t’
Canada’s environmental agency recently released a weather bulletin reporting that:

The national average temperature for the winter of 2011/2012 was 3.6°C above normal (1961-1990 average), based on preliminary data, which makes this the third warmest winter on record since nationwide records began in 1948.

It also noted that Canada’s:
winter temperatures have been at or above normal since 1997.
The infographic above summarizes some of regional impacts of the winter of 2011/2, a.k.a. 'The Winter That Wasn't'. 
Related reading:
- 'Last winter was third-warmest in decades: Environment Canada' (Postmedia News)
- 'Ottawa locks in emissions with delays in carbon rules, agency warns' (Globe & Mail)
- ’Record high greenhouse gases to linger for decades’ (Reuters)
- 'Extreme weather to worsen with climate change: IPCC' (Reuters)
- ‘NASA says Canada in ‘hot spot’ of ecological change’ (CBC)
- ‘Great Lakes show massive ice loss, study says’ (CBC)
(Infographic source: The National Post)

Canada, Our Changing Climate & ‘The Winter That Wasn’t’

Canada’s environmental agency recently released a weather bulletin reporting that:

The national average temperature for the winter of 2011/2012 was 3.6°C above normal (1961-1990 average), based on preliminary data, which makes this the third warmest winter on record since nationwide records began in 1948.

It also noted that Canada’s:

winter temperatures have been at or above normal since 1997.

The infographic above summarizes some of regional impacts of the winter of 2011/2, a.k.a. 'The Winter That Wasn't'

Related reading:

- 'Last winter was third-warmest in decades: Environment Canada' (Postmedia News)

- 'Ottawa locks in emissions with delays in carbon rules, agency warns' (Globe & Mail)

Record high greenhouse gases to linger for decades’ (Reuters)

- 'Extreme weather to worsen with climate change: IPCC' (Reuters)

- NASA says Canada in ‘hot spot’ of ecological change’ (CBC)

- ‘Great Lakes show massive ice loss, study says’ (CBC)

(Infographic source: The National Post)