… what changed was the context. Now, that is a really important lesson for us about how change occurs. We put it off and we delay. We wait until the last minute until nothing else, you know, can possibly get in the way. Until we really have to act now. Then we wait a bit longer, right. And then we do it. And we do that very consistently and that’s the lesson of World War II and that’s the lesson of so many crises, that we wait and we wait and then we panic and then we respond and we do extraordinary things.

A quote from Paul Gilding's talk at Powershift 2013 in Melbourne, Australia. Gilding is one of the world’s most experienced and respected business advisors and public speakers on sustainability and climate change.

    You can check out the rest of his presentation here.

    Related:

    Infographic source: The Climate Council)

    From TEDx via YouTube

    If you are under 30 today, you are on track to find out in your lifetime what unmanageable climate change will be like. Business, politics and economics seem to have no response. What is going wrong and how can you use your voice if you want this fixed in time to fix your future?

    One of the world’s top climate diplomats, John Ashton is now an independent commentator and adviser on the politics of climate change. From 2006-12 he served as Special Representative for Climate Change to three successive UK Foreign Secretaries, spanning the current Coalition and the previous Labour Government. He was a cofounder and, from 2004-6, the first Chief Executive of the think tank E3G. From 1978-2002, after a brief period as a research astronomer, he was a career diplomat, with a particular focus on China. He is a visiting professor at the London University School of Oriental and African Studies, and a Distinguished Policy Fellow at the Grantham Institute for Climate Change at Imperial College.

    Related:

    From CBC:

    The Harper government is pulling out of a United Nations convention that fights droughts in Africa and elsewhere, which would make Canada the only country in the world outside the agreement.

    The UN body has a research committee dedicated to finding ways to stop the spread of droughts that lay waste to farmland across the planet, particularly Africa.

    Scientists, governments and civil society organizations are headed to Bonn next month “to carry out the first ever comprehensive cost-benefit analysis of desertification, land degradation and drought,” says a notice from the United Nations Environment Program.

    "Also, for the very first time, governments will provide concrete data on the status of poverty and of land cover in the areas affected by desertification in their countries."

    The issue of encroaching deserts has become urgent because of renewed droughts that have plunged millions into poverty in Africa’s Sahel belt last year and in East Africa the year before.

    The Bonn-based secretariat for the UN body said no Canadian official had contacted them about the withdrawal.

    In my opinion this is irresponsible and embarrassing and definitely not my Canada. Though I should hardly be surprised. Canada is one of the world’s worst when it comes to tackling climate change and drought is a symptom of climate change.

    You can check out the rest of the article here. The bold facing in the article quote is my own.

    If it seems far-fetched to imagine millions of Americans becoming mini energy producers, just look at Germany, where 51 percent of the country’s clean energy production is owned by individuals or farmers, while major utilities control just 6.5 percent of it.

    A short paragraph from a recent New York Times article, ‘Crowdfunding Clean Energy’.

    (Photo source: Inc.com)

    Sustainability on the Mind: ‘Externalities’

    From Sustainable Man:

    David Suzuki explains the fallacy of conventional economics, in an interview done for the BBC. The song is “Outro” by M83.

    It’s Gettin’ Hot in Here: ‘How to Win a Climate Change Argument’ (Infographic)
Source: 'This Cheat Sheet Will Make You Win Every Climate Argument' (Climate Desk via Grist)
*This is a very handy reference for those of us still fighting climate change denial. However, I do have an issue with the infographic’s title, specifically, its use of the word “believe.” Science is not about beliefs, it is about facts. People can choose to accept the facts or they can ignore them, but either way facts remain facts. I think a better (more scientifically robust) title would be ‘Do you accept the facts of climate change?’ 
Related:
‘Global temperatures highest in 4,000 Years, Study Says’ (New York Times)
 

    It’s Gettin’ Hot in Here: ‘How to Win a Climate Change Argument’ (Infographic)

    Source: 'This Cheat Sheet Will Make You Win Every Climate Argument' (Climate Desk via Grist)

    *This is a very handy reference for those of us still fighting climate change denial. However, I do have an issue with the infographic’s title, specifically, its use of the word “believe.” Science is not about beliefs, it is about facts. People can choose to accept the facts or they can ignore them, but either way facts remain facts. I think a better (more scientifically robust) title would be ‘Do you accept the facts of climate change?’ 

    Related: