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Seen around town: a bird’s eye view of the Stanley Park seawall this past weekend. The seawall is grade separated with lanes for folks on bikes and foot.

Seen around town: a bird’s eye view of the Stanley Park seawall this past weekend. The seawall is grade separated with lanes for folks on bikes and foot.

Some morning light in a great little park on the other side of the Laurel Street overpass here in Vancouver.

Post-sunset up at Burnaby Mountain last night. The silouetted figures are part of a cool, permanent public art installation called 'Playground of the Gods':

Two Japanese artists of Ainu origin, Nubuo (father) and Shusei (son) Toko, are the artists who dedicated these sculptures to the city of Burnaby in 1990. The poles carved in wood represent the story of the gods who descended to earth to give birth to the Ainu people and express 25 years of goodwill between Japanese sister city of Kushiro and the District of Burnaby. (Vancouver Observer)

More snaps here if you’re interested.

A good thing about rainy cities: puddles become mirrors.  
In this case it was a slightly flooded sidewalk out at UBC this afternoon.

A good thing about rainy cities: puddles become mirrors.  

In this case it was a slightly flooded sidewalk out at UBC this afternoon.

Climate Change in Action: Montana’s Famous Glaciers are Melting

From Al Jazeera:

In the US state of Montana, the Glacier National Park - an area sometimes called the “Crown of the Continent” - is famous for its snow-capped mountains.

But it could soon lose its glaciers due to global warming.

Scientists warn if the ice keeps melting at this rate, the park’s 25 remaining glaciers could all melt away by the year 2030.

The US Geological Survey covers the science of Montana’s melting glaciers here. CNN has previously called them, "The poster child for climate change."

City lights after a weekend long festival in Stanley Park. Good times in the summer time. But here we go fall.

City lights after a weekend long festival in Stanley Park. Good times in the summer time. But here we go fall.

Contact with the natural world appears to significantly reduce symptoms of attention deficit disorder in children as young as five. Nearby nature, and even a view of nature from a bedroom window, can reduce stress in children. Children in greener neighborhoods appear to have lower body weight changes. Spending time outdoors may help prevent myopia. Natural environments, such as parks, foster recovery from mental fatigue and may help children as well as adults learn. Green exercise may offer added benefits when compared to equal exertion in indoor gyms. In hospitals, clinics and medical offices, incorporating nature into the design helps people of all ages reduce stress, improve health and cognition.

What if our schools, homes, workplaces and cities were designed with such natural benefits in mind?

Richard Louv, author of 'Last Child in the Woods' and 'The Nature Principle', in his recent article, 'Grow Outside!'

(Photo credit: Sustainable Melbourne)

Seoul’s trailblazing Stream of Consciousness’

From the New York Times:

For half a century, a dark tunnel of crumbling concrete encased more than three miles of a placid stream bisecting this bustling city.

The waterway had been a centerpiece of Seoul since a king of the Choson Dynasty selected the new capital 600 years ago, enticed by the graceful meandering of the stream and its 23 tributaries. But in the industrial era after the Korean War, the stream, by then a rank open sewer, was entombed by pavement and forgotten beneath a lacework of elevated expressways as the city’s population swelled toward 10 million.

Today, after a $384 million recovery project, the stream, called Cheonggyecheon, is liberated from its dank sheath and burbles between reedy banks. Picnickers cool their bare feet in its filtered water, and carp swim in its tranquil pools.

The restoration of the Cheonggyecheon is part of an expanding environmental effort in cities around the world to “daylight” rivers and streams by peeling back pavement that was built to bolster commerce and serve automobile traffic decades ago.

Check out the rest of the article here. The video above is from the documentary series, e²: the economies of being environmentally conscious’ (via Vimeo).