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Leaders in Sustainability: RIP Dr. Elinor Ostrom, First Female Recipient of the Nobel Prize in Economics

In this short video for the Stockholm Resilience Centre Dr. Ostrom: 

explains how people can use natural resources in a sustainable way based on the diversity that exists in the world.

Related:

Open publication - Free publishing

Thinking Globally: 'Living Planet Report 2012'

From WWF:

The Living Planet Report is the world’s leading, science-based analysis on the health of our only planet and the impact of human activity. Its key finding? Humanity’s demands exceed our planet’s capacity to sustain us. That is, we ask for more than what we have.

Thinking Globally: ‘Living Planet Report 2012’ - Ecological Footprint Index

From WWF:

‎”The Living Planet Report is the world’s leading, science-based analysis on the health of our only planet and the impact of human activity. Its key finding? Humanity’s demands exceed our planet’s capacity to sustain us.” 

You can find your country and see how it compares to others using the interactive Eco Footprint calculator above. 

Related:

'How to be a conscious consumer' (WWF)

'Earth's environment getting worse, not better, says WWF ahead of Rio+20' (The Guardian)

We’re Drawing Down Our Account: Responses So Far to our Natural Capital Challenge
The picture above is a screen grab from Scientific American’s new interactive, media rich presentation, How Much Is Left?, described as:

A graphical accounting of the limits to what one planet can provide

The thing to keep in mind of course is that it’s our planet or rather the planet we share with future generations and our non-human partners on Earth. Depressing stuff but also the reality we have to deal with. So rather than dwell on the negatives I thought I’d profile some of the efforts afoot to address this ultimate of challenges and advance global sustainability:
 The Biosphere Economy initiative seeks to build a “a future where business-as-usual and politics-as-usual increasingly take  account of natural capital and related forms of value, bridging the gap  between man-made assets and nature’s ecological infrastructures that  underpin our economies and societies.” Worldchanging profiles the initiative in the article The Emergence of a Biosphere Economy. 
The latest report on The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) is due shortly. TEEB is a “major international initiative to draw attention to the global economic  benefits of biodiversity, to highlight the growing costs of biodiversity  loss and ecosystem degradation, and to draw together expertise from the  fields of science, economics and policy to enable practical actions  moving forward.” The Guardian article Economic report into biodiversity crisis reveals price of consuming the planet profiled the initiative in the spring.  
World Wildlife Fund is campaigning to convince 100 key companies to go sustainable based on thinking that if they do “global  markets will shift to protect the planet our consumption has already  outgrown.” There is a great TED lecture Jason Clay: How big brands can help save biodiversity explaining the initiative.
2010 is the UN’s International Year of Biodiversity. Their website shows a raft of initiatives.
The Rio +20 Conference, known officially as the 2012 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, is coming up. At a workshop in May a group of "seasoned experts" produced a statement explaining their ideas on the way forward. 

We’re Drawing Down Our Account: Responses So Far to our Natural Capital Challenge

The picture above is a screen grab from Scientific American’s new interactive, media rich presentation, How Much Is Left?, described as:

A graphical accounting of the limits to what one planet can provide

The thing to keep in mind of course is that it’s our planet or rather the planet we share with future generations and our non-human partners on Earth. Depressing stuff but also the reality we have to deal with. So rather than dwell on the negatives I thought I’d profile some of the efforts afoot to address this ultimate of challenges and advance global sustainability:

  1. The Biosphere Economy initiative seeks to build a “a future where business-as-usual and politics-as-usual increasingly take account of natural capital and related forms of value, bridging the gap between man-made assets and nature’s ecological infrastructures that underpin our economies and societies.” Worldchanging profiles the initiative in the article The Emergence of a Biosphere Economy.
  2. The latest report on The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) is due shortly. TEEB is a “major international initiative to draw attention to the global economic benefits of biodiversity, to highlight the growing costs of biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation, and to draw together expertise from the fields of science, economics and policy to enable practical actions moving forward.” The Guardian article Economic report into biodiversity crisis reveals price of consuming the planet profiled the initiative in the spring.  
  3. World Wildlife Fund is campaigning to convince 100 key companies to go sustainable based on thinking that if they do “global markets will shift to protect the planet our consumption has already outgrown.” There is a great TED lecture Jason Clay: How big brands can help save biodiversity explaining the initiative.
  4. 2010 is the UN’s International Year of Biodiversity. Their website shows a raft of initiatives.
  5. The Rio +20 Conference, known officially as the 2012 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, is coming up. At a workshop in May a group of "seasoned experts" produced a statement explaining their ideas on the way forward.