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If it seems far-fetched to imagine millions of Americans becoming mini energy producers, just look at Germany, where 51 percent of the country’s clean energy production is owned by individuals or farmers, while major utilities control just 6.5 percent of it.

A short paragraph from a recent New York Times article, ‘Crowdfunding Clean Energy’.

(Photo source: Inc.com)

Truth!(Source: Post Carbon Institute)

Truth!

(Source: Post Carbon Institute)

I usually stick to sustainability and city themed posts on this blog of mine, but this conversation between a gay Vietnam War veteran and U.S. presidential candidate Mitt Romney definitely deserves an exception. This vet is a hero. Full stop.

P.S. It’s worth watching all the way to the end too.  (Source: ABC News via Upworthy)
We’ve got to somehow get everybody to understand that a different and better energy system is not only just possible, it’s inevitable.

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Michael Liebreich, CEO of Bloomberg New Energy Finance, in an interview for The Huffington Post article, 'Is Clean Energy Doomed If President Obama Is Not Re-Elected?'

(Photo source: Pew Clean Energy Program)

'What do you think our most powerful renewable resource is?' 
This is one of 12 editorial cartoons being considered by the Union of Concerned Scientists in their annual calendar contest. You can check them out and vote on your favorite here.
Related:
Naomi Oreskes: ‘The verdict is in on climate change’ (Los Angeles Times)
‘Fear of climate change may finally be trumping ideological denial’ (Huffington Post)

'What do you think our most powerful renewable resource is?' 

This is one of 12 editorial cartoons being considered by the Union of Concerned Scientists in their annual calendar contest. You can check them out and vote on your favorite here.

Related:

It’s Gettin’ Hot in Here: ‘State of the Climate: 2011 Global Surface Temperature’
From ClimateWatch Magazine:

Earth’s average annual surface temperature is higher today than it was when record-keeping began in the late 1800s, an indicator of long-term, global-scale climate warming. The red line shows how far above or below the 1981-2010 average (dashed line at zero) the combined land and ocean temperature has been each year since 1880. The data shown are one of several temperature analyses included in the State of the Climate in 2011, all of which show a warming trend.
The 2011 average global surface temperature was between 0.07 and 0.16 degrees Celsius warmer (0.13 and 0.29 degrees Fahrenheit), than the 1981–2010 average, based on a range of analyses. Including the 2011 temperature, the rate of warming since 1971 is now between 0.14° and 0.17° Celsius per decade (0.25°-0.31° Fahrenheit), and 0.71-0.77° Celsius per century (1.28°-1.39° F) since 1901.

Check out the rest of the article here.
Related:
Presentation Slides: ‘State of the Climate 2011’ (NOAA)
‘Cool Pacific Pattern Shaped 2011 Weather Extremes; Heat Dominates U.S. in 2012’ (New York Times)

(Graphic sources: NOAA) 

It’s Gettin’ Hot in Here: ‘State of the Climate: 2011 Global Surface Temperature’

From ClimateWatch Magazine:

Earth’s average annual surface temperature is higher today than it was when record-keeping began in the late 1800s, an indicator of long-term, global-scale climate warming. The red line shows how far above or below the 1981-2010 average (dashed line at zero) the combined land and ocean temperature has been each year since 1880. The data shown are one of several temperature analyses included in the State of the Climate in 2011, all of which show a warming trend.

The 2011 average global surface temperature was between 0.07 and 0.16 degrees Celsius warmer (0.13 and 0.29 degrees Fahrenheit), than the 1981–2010 average, based on a range of analyses. Including the 2011 temperature, the rate of warming since 1971 is now between 0.14° and 0.17° Celsius per decade (0.25°-0.31° Fahrenheit), and 0.71-0.77° Celsius per century (1.28°-1.39° F) since 1901.

Check out the rest of the article here.

Related:

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(Graphic sources: NOAA