Victoria remains Canada’s cycling commuter capital, with nearly 6 per cent of residents choosing to ride a bicycle on their daily commute. An additional 10 per cent of Victorians commute by foot.

On the other end of the spectrum, St. John’s and Saint John have the lowest rates of bicycle commuting in Canada, but comparatively high rates of walking to work. Montreal, Toronto and Ottawa have the highest percentage of citizens depending on public transit to get them to work, with more than one in five using those systems.

Across Canada, it’s the cities struggling with congestion the most that are seeing the strongest gains in active transportation. Walking and cycling to work is often seen as a way of avoiding the headaches of public transit and the slow slog of a packed freeway.

Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Edmonton and Vancouver all posted gains in active transportation between 2006 and 2011.

Seen Around, Another Town:
I’m always on the lookout for cool and interesting bike infrastructure when exploring cities. I came this bike corral in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighbourhood recently.
The car-shaped corral occupies what would traditionally be space for one car to park in. It provides space for up to twenty bikes. 
However, despite its clever and efficient design the corral has some limitations compared with other designs:

Seattle’s Department of Transportation has started installing on-street bike corrals that are easier to use, more versatile and expandable, and cost just a third as much as the ones they had been using.  (Seattle Bike Blog)

Seen Around, Another Town:

I’m always on the lookout for cool and interesting bike infrastructure when exploring cities. I came this bike corral in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighbourhood recently.

The car-shaped corral occupies what would traditionally be space for one car to park in. It provides space for up to twenty bikes. 

However, despite its clever and efficient design the corral has some limitations compared with other designs:

Seattle’s Department of Transportation has started installing on-street bike corrals that are easier to use, more versatile and expandable, and cost just a third as much as the ones they had been using.  (Seattle Bike Blog)

Getting Around: ‘Good Bicycle Karma’ (Video)

Here’s a fun, simple, and low cost idea to encourage smart and safe cycling in cities. Copenhagen’s 'Karmaspotters' walk the streets of the city giving out good karma presents to cyclists who are being considerate while biking around the city.

(Source: Cycling Embassy of Denmark)

Related:

From The Economist:

MORE and more Americans are taking to the road on two wheels. Between 1977 and 2009 the total number of annual bike trips more than tripled, while the bike’s share of all trips rose from 0.6% to 1%. Commuting cyclists have also increased in number, with twice as many biking to work in 2009 as in 2000.

The growth comes thanks to cycle-friendly policymaking and increases in government spending. In Portland, which brought in a comprehensive programme, cycling levels have increased sixfold since the early 1990s. In Chicago the motivation is to improve the quality of life, and thus encourage both businesses and families to move there.

In a forthcoming book, “City Cycling”, John Pucher and Ralph Buehler argue that the bike boom needs to be expanded to a broader cross-section of people. Almost all the growth in cycling in America has come from men aged 25-64. Rates of cycling have actually fallen slightly among women and sharply among children, most probably because of nervousness about safety. But in fact cycling is getting safer all the time. According to a paper by Messrs Pucher and Buehler with Mark Seinen, fatalities per 10m bike trips fell by 65% between 1977 and 2009, from 5.1 to 1.8. In their book, the authors claim that the health benefits of cycling far exceed the safety risks.

As 48% of trips in American cities are shorter than three miles, there is big potential for further growth.

Check out the rest of the article here.

(Photo credit: City Cycling)