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Bikes and balloons: A shot from the streets of Amsterdam

Bikes and balloons: A shot from the streets of Amsterdam

Seen around town: riding the sunset at English Bay

Seen around town: riding the sunset at English Bay

Seen around town: a bird’s eye view of the Stanley Park seawall this past weekend. The seawall is grade separated with lanes for folks on bikes and foot.

Seen around town: a bird’s eye view of the Stanley Park seawall this past weekend. The seawall is grade separated with lanes for folks on bikes and foot.

here are some recent reflections from around town


I’ve got some more pics here if you’re interested in checking ‘em out.



Seen around town: An old bike repurposed into a mini street side garden on the 10th avenue bikeway here in Vancouver

Seen around town: An old bike repurposed into a mini street side garden on the 10th avenue bikeway here in Vancouver

Around Town: Granville Street, just south of West Georgia (Downtown)
earlier this week

Around Town: Granville Street, just south of West Georgia (Downtown)

earlier this week

Getting Around, Safely: ‘Share the Road’ (PSA)

An encouraging sign of the times from the Canadian Automobile Association via their YouTube page. Who knows? Maybe one day they’ll just be known as the Canadian Mobility Association.

Related:

(Source: youtube.com)

Gonna ride my bike til the break o’ dawn… 

Gonna ride my bike til the break o’ dawn… 

… between 2000 and 2009, U.S. transportation and housing costs increased at nearly twice the rate of incomes. But the good news… is that people living in “location efficient” neighborhoods—those with good access to transit, jobs, and amenities—experienced only half the increase in transportation costs ($1,400/year) of those living in car-dependent places ($3,900/year). This means more expensive housing may actually be the more affordable option, if that housing exists in the right place.

A paragraph from the Atlantic Cities article, 'How More Expensive Housing Can Actually Cost You Less', which highlights the growing economic benefits of living in walkable/ “location efficient” neighborhoods.

The website for the 'Housing and Transportation Affordability Index' explains that:

People who live in location inefficient places are auto-dependent, have high transportation costs, and are more susceptible to fluctuations in gas prices. 

This trend is projected to only get stronger (e.g. here, here, and here) as gas prices rise in response to the "the end of the petroleum era." 

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(Graphic credit: The Housing + Transportation Affordability Index)