Infographic: ‘Earth’s oceans and ecosystems still absorbing about half the greenhouse gases emitted by people’
Details over at NOAA.
Related:
'The Carbon Bathtub' (National Geographic)

Infographic: ‘Earth’s oceans and ecosystems still absorbing about half the greenhouse gases emitted by people’

Details over at NOAA.

Related:

Globally, June was 4th warmest on record, NOAA announced today. And over the Northern Hemisphere, for the second consecutive month, temperatures were as warm as they’ve been in 133 years of records. Notably, the Arctic experienced its largest June sea ice loss since the start of satellite records in 1979.

It was the 36th consecutive June and 328th consecutive month with temperatures warmer than the 20th century average, NOAA said…

The decline of Arctic sea ice is one of the more telling indicators of recent warmth in the Northern Hemisphere. The Arctic lost the equivalent of 1.1 million square miles of ice in June (most on record), its extent falling to 9.8 percent below average, second lowest on record (since 1979).

Snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere, another indicator of temperature, reached its lowest extent in 45 years of June records.

It’s Gettin’ Hot in Here: ‘State of the Climate: 2011 Global Surface Temperature’
From ClimateWatch Magazine:

Earth’s average annual surface temperature is higher today than it was when record-keeping began in the late 1800s, an indicator of long-term, global-scale climate warming. The red line shows how far above or below the 1981-2010 average (dashed line at zero) the combined land and ocean temperature has been each year since 1880. The data shown are one of several temperature analyses included in the State of the Climate in 2011, all of which show a warming trend.
The 2011 average global surface temperature was between 0.07 and 0.16 degrees Celsius warmer (0.13 and 0.29 degrees Fahrenheit), than the 1981–2010 average, based on a range of analyses. Including the 2011 temperature, the rate of warming since 1971 is now between 0.14° and 0.17° Celsius per decade (0.25°-0.31° Fahrenheit), and 0.71-0.77° Celsius per century (1.28°-1.39° F) since 1901.

Check out the rest of the article here.
Related:
Presentation Slides: ‘State of the Climate 2011’ (NOAA)
‘Cool Pacific Pattern Shaped 2011 Weather Extremes; Heat Dominates U.S. in 2012’ (New York Times)

(Graphic sources: NOAA) 

It’s Gettin’ Hot in Here: ‘State of the Climate: 2011 Global Surface Temperature’

From ClimateWatch Magazine:

Earth’s average annual surface temperature is higher today than it was when record-keeping began in the late 1800s, an indicator of long-term, global-scale climate warming. The red line shows how far above or below the 1981-2010 average (dashed line at zero) the combined land and ocean temperature has been each year since 1880. The data shown are one of several temperature analyses included in the State of the Climate in 2011, all of which show a warming trend.

The 2011 average global surface temperature was between 0.07 and 0.16 degrees Celsius warmer (0.13 and 0.29 degrees Fahrenheit), than the 1981–2010 average, based on a range of analyses. Including the 2011 temperature, the rate of warming since 1971 is now between 0.14° and 0.17° Celsius per decade (0.25°-0.31° Fahrenheit), and 0.71-0.77° Celsius per century (1.28°-1.39° F) since 1901.

Check out the rest of the article here.

Related:

(Graphic sources: NOAA

From Reuters:

Scorching temperatures in June’s second half helped the continental United States break its record for the hottest first six months in a calendar year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said on Monday.

The last 12 months also have been the warmest since modern record-keeping began in 1895, narrowly beating the previous 12-month period that ended in May 2012.

Every state except Washington in the contiguous United States had warmer-than-average temperatures for the June 2011-June 2012 period.

The recent blistering heat wave broke records across much of the United States, threatening the Midwest’s corn crop and helping to fan destructive wildfires.

June was 2 degrees Fahrenheit (1.1 degrees Celsius) warmer in the lower 48 states than the 20th-century average, but still just the 14th hottest June in the record books, NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center said in a statement.

Such record-high temperatures are in line with a long-term warming trend in the 48 contiguous states, said Jake Crouch, a scientist at the National Climatic Data Center.

Climate change spurred by carbon dioxide emissions may not be the primary cause, but these extreme conditions are consistent with what scientists see as a “new normal,” Crouch said by telephone.

"It’s hard to pinpoint climate change as the driving factor, but it appears that it is playing a role," he said. "What’s going on for 2012 is exactly what we would expect from climate change."

Check out the rest of the article here.

Related:

(Map credit: NOAA)

Extreme Weather in the USA: ‘Over 15,000 Records Broken as March 2012 Becomes Warmest on Record’

From NOAA Visualizations:

According to NOAA scientists at the National Climatic Data Center (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/), record and near-record breaking temperatures dominated the eastern two-thirds of the nation and contributed to the warmest March on record for the contiguous United States, a record that dates back to 1895. This animation shows the locations of each of the 7,755 daytime and 7,517 nighttime records (or tied records) in sequence over the 31 days in March.

(Graphic source: NOAA)

From The Vancouver Sun:

Large-scale green energy systems can affordably replace fossil fuel as the world’s primary source of electricity within 20 years, new research from the United States weather office suggests.

… a director with the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said Friday in Vancouver that wind and solar could supply 70 per cent of electricity demand in the lower 48 states, with fossil fuel and hydro/nuclear renewables each accounting for just 15 per cent by 2030.

Check out the rest of the article here

(Photo credit: Vancouver Sun)

Climate Change: 200 Years of Global Warming in 2 Minutes

From YouTube:

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration produced this video showing the unique nature of the modern spike in the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide. 

The New York Times’ Andrew Revkin looks at the trend and its implications here.

Infographic: ‘A Changing Climate is Changing Plants’ |
From NOAA:

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the American Public Gardens Association (APGA) today announced an innovative pilot project at Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, Pa., that links NOAA’s internationally recognized climate services and APGA’s public gardens, which receive more than 70 million visitors a year. This marks the beginning of a new partnership focused on educating gardeners and garden enthusiasts about the possible effects of climate change on America’s gardens, landscapes and green spaces.
…
Priorities of the new partnership include: increased climate literacy via public education at public gardens; increased community engagement in addressing climate variability and change as part of both short- and long-term community planning and adaptation; ongoing professional exchanges between NOAA and public garden professionals on climate change issues; and development of a public clearinghouse for information about climate change and adaptation.

Check out the rest of the article here.

Infographic: ‘A Changing Climate is Changing Plants’ |

From NOAA:

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the American Public Gardens Association (APGA) today announced an innovative pilot project at Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, Pa., that links NOAA’s internationally recognized climate services and APGA’s public gardens, which receive more than 70 million visitors a year. This marks the beginning of a new partnership focused on educating gardeners and garden enthusiasts about the possible effects of climate change on America’s gardens, landscapes and green spaces.

Priorities of the new partnership include: increased climate literacy via public education at public gardens; increased community engagement in addressing climate variability and change as part of both short- and long-term community planning and adaptation; ongoing professional exchanges between NOAA and public garden professionals on climate change issues; and development of a public clearinghouse for information about climate change and adaptation.

Check out the rest of the article here.

The ‘2010 State of the Climate’ Report: 
Indicators show a “clear and unmistakable signal” that our world continues to warm, making extreme weather events more likely
From The Washington Post:

The world’s climate is not only continuing to warm, it’s adding heat-trapping greenhouse gases even faster than in the past, researchers said Tuesday.
Indeed, the global temperature has been warmer than the 20th century average every month for more than 25 years, they said at a teleconference.
“The indicators show unequivocally that the world continues to warm,” Thomas R. Karl, director of the National Climatic Data Center, said in releasing the annual State of the Climate report for 2010.
“There is a clear and unmistakable signal from the top of the atmosphere to the depths of the oceans,” added Peter Thorne of the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites, North Carolina State University.
Carbon dioxide increased by 2.60 parts per million in the atmosphere in 2010, which is more than the average annual increase seen from 1980-2010, Karl added. Carbon dioxide is the major greenhouse gas accumulating in the air that atmospheric scientists blame for warming the climate.
The warmer conditions are consistent with events such as heat waves and extreme rainfall, Karl said at a teleconference. However, it is more difficult to make a direct connection with things like tornado outbreaks, he said.
“Any single weather event is driven by a number of factors, from local conditions to global climate patterns and trends. Climate change is one of these,” he said. “It is very likely that large-scale changes in climate, such as increased moisture in the atmosphere and warming temperatures, have influenced — and will continue to influence — many different types of extreme events, such as heavy rainfall, flooding, heat waves and droughts.
The report, being published by the American Meteorological Society, lists 2010 as tied with 2005 for the warmest year on record, according to studies by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and NASA. A separate analysis, done in Britain, lists 2010 as second warmest.
…

For more, check out the rest of the article, the full report, its highlights and colourful press briefing slides. 
(Image credit: NOAA)

The ‘2010 State of the Climate’ Report:

Indicators show a “clear and unmistakable signal” that our world continues to warm, making extreme weather events more likely

From The Washington Post:

The world’s climate is not only continuing to warm, it’s adding heat-trapping greenhouse gases even faster than in the past, researchers said Tuesday.

Indeed, the global temperature has been warmer than the 20th century average every month for more than 25 years, they said at a teleconference.

“The indicators show unequivocally that the world continues to warm,” Thomas R. Karl, director of the National Climatic Data Center, said in releasing the annual State of the Climate report for 2010.

“There is a clear and unmistakable signal from the top of the atmosphere to the depths of the oceans,” added Peter Thorne of the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites, North Carolina State University.

Carbon dioxide increased by 2.60 parts per million in the atmosphere in 2010, which is more than the average annual increase seen from 1980-2010, Karl added. Carbon dioxide is the major greenhouse gas accumulating in the air that atmospheric scientists blame for warming the climate.

The warmer conditions are consistent with events such as heat waves and extreme rainfall, Karl said at a teleconference. However, it is more difficult to make a direct connection with things like tornado outbreaks, he said.

“Any single weather event is driven by a number of factors, from local conditions to global climate patterns and trends. Climate change is one of these,” he said. “It is very likely that large-scale changes in climate, such as increased moisture in the atmosphere and warming temperatures, have influenced — and will continue to influence — many different types of extreme events, such as heavy rainfall, flooding, heat waves and droughts.

The report, being published by the American Meteorological Society, lists 2010 as tied with 2005 for the warmest year on record, according to studies by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and NASA. A separate analysis, done in Britain, lists 2010 as second warmest.

For more, check out the rest of the articlethe full report, its highlights and colourful press briefing slides

(Image credit: NOAA)

The devastating string of tornadoes, droughts, wildfires and floods that hit the United States this spring marks 2011 as one of the most extreme years on record, according to a new federal analysis.

Just shy of the halfway mark, 2011 has seen eight $1-billion-plus disasters, with total damages from wild weather at more than $32 billion, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Agency officials said that total could grow significantly, since they expect this year’s North Atlantic hurricane season, which began June 1, will be an active one.

Overall, NOAA experts said extreme weather events have grown more frequent in the United States since 1980. Part of that shift is due to climate change, said Tom Karl, director of the agency’s National Climatic Data Center.

"Extremes of precipitation are generally increasing because the planet is actually warming and more water is evaporating from the oceans,” he said. “This extra water vapor in the atmosphere then enables rain and snow events to become more extensive and intense than they might otherwise be.”

But for some kinds of extreme weather, teasing out a contribution from climate change is more difficult.

The second half of April brought a swarm of tornadoes that leveled parts of the Midwest, including the twister that killed 151 people in Joplin, Mo. So far, 2011 has seen the sixth-highest number of tornado deaths on record, prompting many people to wonder whether climate change has played a role. So far, scientists say there’s no good evidence for or against a climate change influence on tornado behavior.

Meanwhile, computer models predict that droughts — like those that have scorched large swaths of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona this year — will become stronger and more frequent as climate change continues. But because patterns of drought vary widely from decade to decade, that makes it “very difficult and unlikely that we’re going to be able to discern a human fingerprint, if there is one, on the drought record in the foreseeable future,” Karl said.

Read the rest of the article here.

(Image credit: NOAA