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Bees, Other Pollinators Worth Est’d $250 Billion to Global Food Production, Economy
From The Huffington Post:

 
What salary would you expect to pay a force of internationally diverse workers who toil harmoniously — without pension plans, paid overtime or the threat of union action — to produce 87 per cent of North America’s food supply?
How about… nothing?
Concordia University biologist Melanie McCavour is seeking greater recognition of the economic value of work done by bees and other crop-pollinating creatures.
…
Current estimates of the value of global annual agricultural production provided by natural crop-pollinators are in the neighbourhood of $250 billion.   

Assigning a tangible monetary value to the pollination service is the first step in establishing a protocol for protecting its workers. The logic goes that if people realize the labour value of bees, bats, birds, beetles, and butterflies, policy-makers will be likelier to develop better environmental and agricultural policies.
Any alternative to natural pollinators — such as having untold numbers of human beings manually spread pollen with paintbrushes and Q-tips — would be economically unfeasible, not to mention physically implausible.
With a decline in bee populations, McCavour called for major changes in pollination and agriculture practices.

 
Check out the rest of the article here.
(Photo credit: Glenn Apiaries)

Bees, Other Pollinators Worth Est’d $250 Billion to Global Food Production, Economy

From The Huffington Post:

What salary would you expect to pay a force of internationally diverse workers who toil harmoniously — without pension plans, paid overtime or the threat of union action — to produce 87 per cent of North America’s food supply?

How about… nothing?

Concordia University biologist Melanie McCavour is seeking greater recognition of the economic value of work done by bees and other crop-pollinating creatures.

Current estimates of the value of global annual agricultural production provided by natural crop-pollinators are in the neighbourhood of $250 billion.   

Assigning a tangible monetary value to the pollination service is the first step in establishing a protocol for protecting its workers. The logic goes that if people realize the labour value of bees, bats, birds, beetles, and butterflies, policy-makers will be likelier to develop better environmental and agricultural policies.

Any alternative to natural pollinators — such as having untold numbers of human beings manually spread pollen with paintbrushes and Q-tips — would be economically unfeasible, not to mention physically implausible.

With a decline in bee populations, McCavour called for major changes in pollination and agriculture practices.

Check out the rest of the article here.

(Photo credit: Glenn Apiaries)