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Getting Around: ‘The Greener Way to Get There’ (Infographic)
More info here.
(Source: 1 Block Off the Grid)

Getting Around: ‘The Greener Way to Get There’ (Infographic)

More info here.

(Source: 1 Block Off the Grid)

It’s gettin’ hot in here: 'Rate of arctic summer sea ice loss is 50% higher than predicted'
From The Guardian:

Sea ice in the Arctic is disappearing at a far greater rate than previously expected, according to data from the first purpose-built satellite launched to study the thickness of the Earth’s polar caps.
…
This rate of loss is 50% higher than most scenarios outlined by polar scientists and suggests that global warming, triggered by rising greenhouse gas emissions, is beginning to have a major impact on the region. In a few years the Arctic ocean could be free of ice in summer, triggering a rush to exploit its fish stocks, oil, minerals and sea routes.
…
The consequences of losing the Arctic’s ice coverage, even for only part of the year, could be profound. Without the cap’s white brilliance to reflect sunlight back into space, the region will heat up even more than at present. As a result, ocean temperatures will rise and methane deposits on the ocean floor could melt, evaporate and bubble into the atmosphere. Scientists have recently reported evidence that methane plumes are now appearing in many areas. Methane is a particularly powerful greenhouse gas and rising levels of it in the atmosphere are only likely to accelerate global warming. And with the disappearance of sea ice around the shores of Greenland, its glaciers could melt faster and raise sea levels even more rapidly than at present.

Check out the rest of the article here.
(Infographic source: The Guardian)

It’s gettin’ hot in here: 'Rate of arctic summer sea ice loss is 50% higher than predicted'

From The Guardian:

Sea ice in the Arctic is disappearing at a far greater rate than previously expected, according to data from the first purpose-built satellite launched to study the thickness of the Earth’s polar caps.

This rate of loss is 50% higher than most scenarios outlined by polar scientists and suggests that global warming, triggered by rising greenhouse gas emissions, is beginning to have a major impact on the region. In a few years the Arctic ocean could be free of ice in summer, triggering a rush to exploit its fish stocks, oil, minerals and sea routes.

The consequences of losing the Arctic’s ice coverage, even for only part of the year, could be profound. Without the cap’s white brilliance to reflect sunlight back into space, the region will heat up even more than at present. As a result, ocean temperatures will rise and methane deposits on the ocean floor could melt, evaporate and bubble into the atmosphere. Scientists have recently reported evidence that methane plumes are now appearing in many areas. Methane is a particularly powerful greenhouse gas and rising levels of it in the atmosphere are only likely to accelerate global warming. And with the disappearance of sea ice around the shores of Greenland, its glaciers could melt faster and raise sea levels even more rapidly than at present.

Check out the rest of the article here.

(Infographic source: The Guardian)

Connecting the Science Dots: Extreme Weather & Climate Change (Infographic)
Details here. 
Related:
'Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation' (IPCC, 2011)
(Infographic source: UCS)

Connecting the Science Dots: Extreme Weather & Climate Change (Infographic)

Details here

Related:

(Infographic source: UCS)

Globally, June was 4th warmest on record, NOAA announced today. And over the Northern Hemisphere, for the second consecutive month, temperatures were as warm as they’ve been in 133 years of records. Notably, the Arctic experienced its largest June sea ice loss since the start of satellite records in 1979.

It was the 36th consecutive June and 328th consecutive month with temperatures warmer than the 20th century average, NOAA said…

The decline of Arctic sea ice is one of the more telling indicators of recent warmth in the Northern Hemisphere. The Arctic lost the equivalent of 1.1 million square miles of ice in June (most on record), its extent falling to 9.8 percent below average, second lowest on record (since 1979).

Snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere, another indicator of temperature, reached its lowest extent in 45 years of June records.

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A quote from the Washington Post article, 'Northern hemisphere warmest on record, Arctic ice has biggest melt in June'.

Related:

(Map source: NOAA)

Extreme Weather: What’s Causing Unusually Hot Temperatures in the U.S.?’

From PBS via YouTube:

Lack of water, “the great air conditioner”, is causing unusually high temperatures and extreme weather events in the United States, Kevin Trenberth with the National Center for Atmospheric Research tells Judy Woodruff.

Related:

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(Map credit: NOAA via Climate Central)